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Archive for February, 2010

“The trouble with our liberal friends is not that they are ignorant, but that they know so much that isn’t so.” — Ronald Reagan

President Reagan would have liked my father.

Everyone, it seems, has a relative who repeats old jokes at family functions. One of my Dad’s favorites used to be:

Q: “Why don’t donkeys go to school?”

A: “Because nobody likes a smart ass!”

Now, I didn’t say they were good jokes, but read on–I’ll get straight to the point.

Know it All (KIA) Syndrome

Our country is in the process of rejecting the premises and policies of “donkeys” who went to school and grew up to be “smart asses” or, to put it more mildly, “Know-It-Alls” (KIAs). Sure, they can write a decent term paper and be rewarded with a good grade from a proudly socialist professor. Upon graduation, they can prepare a thesis and fulfill the requirements established to earn a Masters degree. And clearly, when they put resumes together and land a job at a “non-profit” like ACORN, they know how to churn out grant proposals that like-minded and equally clueless bureaucrats will find compelling and worthy of hard-earned tax dollars. But do they know how their predominantly liberal academic indoctrination translates into tangible, “real world” results? Hell no, and we may be feeling the effects of this disconnect for generations if we don’t act NOW!

America Has Woken Up!

The people of this country are waking up to this “KIA Syndrome”. They are rejecting the premise that if a proposal, however ill-conceived, sounds “nice” or “kind” or “just”, it is the responsibility of the taxpayer to shell out trillions of dollars to implement it. They are looking more closely at our Constitution for guidance on the true role and powers of government. They are mobilizing, blogging, tweeting, donating, volunteering, voting and yes, shouting! They are saying NO to “Know-It-Alls”!

Message Sent…and Ignored.

In New Jersey, Virginia and Massachusetts, the message was sent: If you’re a “KIA”, even in a “Blue State”, your political career will be “KIA” (Killed in Action*). If you’re “too smart” for the “ignorant masses” and continue to insist that your liberal agenda is even remotely in our interests, you will soon be looking for work in an increasingly difficult economic environment. Your local races, like it or not, are now also national races, and you can do nothing about it…except to “wake your smart asses up” and start listening to the people. That is the only way you might keep your current job or have any hope for future elective office. We’re on to you, and we’ve had enough!

From all indications, “KIAs” see Tea Parties and other grassroots efforts in the same way they see debunked global warming data–as an “inconvenient truth”. But because they insist that they are smarter than everyone, they pursue the same senseless strategies and tactics. This is good news for “common sense conservatives” across the country.

2010 will be a good year and I’m looking forward to it. We will see more Veterans, business people and first-time candidates elected this year than ever before. It’s time for some sanity. It’s time for change that actually works. It’s time to remove the liberal KIAs once and for all.

(*In case Rachel Maddow or Keith Olbermann read this and want to take me out of context: I believe in the political process and do not advocate violence. “Killed in Action” is not to be taken literally!)

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#41stVote

Shortly after the special election for US Senate in Massachusetts, I “came out” as the person responsible for creating, advocating and “driving” the #41stVote “hash tag” on Twitter.

I was part of the volunteer “Brown Brigade” and one of the many Scott Brown supporters who realized #41stVote was THE key national value proposition of the campaign. Why else would someone in PA (@AngelaRMLash) , Utah (@LadyLibertas93), Alabama (@Victoria_29) or California (friends of @ChuckDeVore) make calls from home, blog about the race, comment on news stories or click the “DONATE” button on a web site? After all, Scott Brown was a relatively obscure Republican State Senator in a presumed “safe haven” for Democrats. Clearly, and justifiably, people questioned the content, transparency and integrity of the health care bill. They saw that it was in their immediate interest–and the immediate national interest–to force Harry Reid “back to the drawing board” by ending his filibuster-proof “super majority” in the US Senate.

#41stVote organized, categorized and crystalized the message. It bonded individual bloggers, tweeters and patriots who wanted common sense conservatism and good government applied not just to health care and other “big bills”, but to all legislative initiatives. Together, these “regular people” became the media! Their clear, powerful and collective plea was: “Stop right there–we can do better!” The voters of Massachusetts agreed, and on 1/19/10, Scott Brown pulled off a political miracle by replacing liberal icon Ted Kennedy in the US Senate.

#Code41

I contend that Scott Brown’s unlikely and historic victory could be the beginning of what (the prominent and highly respected political analyst) Michael Barone once termed a “critical realignment” in American politics. Grassroots activism, (on and offline), did not simply disappear with Brown’s US Senate campaign. Energized by victories in New Jersey, Virginia and Massachusetts, proponents of common sense conservatism want to know: What’s next? My hope is that their enthusiasm endures and political momentum accelerates across the nation–that is why I’ve created the #Code41 hashtag on Twitter.

#Code41 is a call to action. It is an urgent beckoning to those “regular people” who helped Scott Brown with #41stVote to “keep that truck rolling” across America. If you reject the dubious premises, policies and tactics of Obama, Reid and Pelosi, I urge you to support your favorite candidates, share great content, meet new friends and promote “online democracy” via the #Code41 hashtag.

#Code41 is not sponsored or formally endorsed by any specific candidate, Party, organization, PAC or special interest group. It is simply a #41stVote “spin-off” created to move the “good government” discussion forward at this critical time in our nation’s history.

#41stVote “went viral” and helped save our country from the ill-conceived, pork-laden and potentially disastrous monstrosity called the health care bill. Let’s do it again with #Code41 and restore transparency, integrity and common sense to the political process!


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For decades, companies have mailed “thank you cards” to their clients and colleagues. Expressing gratitude is both a nice thing to do and a sound business practice. In fact, I still recommend this traditional tactic in certain circumstances. However, many¬† “greener”, cheaper, less time consuming and more modern versions of the Hallmark approach are now available online.

Let’s look at Twitter as an example. Assuming you’ve joined the “great cocktail party” called social media and opened a free Twitter account, there are four basic “thank you” tools immediately at your disposal. (These tools also serve other purposes which I will address at another time.)

The “Retweet” (RT)

(e.g. RT @jslconsulting)

Nothing says “I hear you” quite like the retweet. When someone posts a comment or link that you like, sharing it with your followers is a compliment. The RT is a great way to say “I agree with you…and thanks for providing good content” to a fellow tweeter. I assure you that RTs are appreciated, remembered and often returned.

#FollowFriday (#FF)

(e.g. #FF @ConsultJohn)

Without question, my favorite day to tweet is Friday. The # symbol is called a “hashtag” and it is a method of categorizing Twitter content. When people mention your Twitter handle after typing #FF, they are proclaiming to the world that you are a good “tweet” to follow. They are thanking you for your content and engagement as well as recommending you to their “friends”. Many “real world” business relationships and friendships have developed because of #FF “shout outs”!

Direct Messages (DMs)

RTs and #FFs are viewable in the public “tweet stream”. For a private and more personal approach, you can send a quick note to individual tweeters. DMs are essentially Twitter’s email. Recognizing someone’s efforts is always a good thing, but I would caution you not to promote yourself in the process. (e.g. Don’t “pimp your blog” in the guise of gratitude.) I would also remind you that if someone has 30,000 followers, they may have a backlog of DMs to review. Still, when used properly, kind DMs are generally well received.

Lists

A relatively new tool provides users with the capacity to organize, and share with the public, categories of tweeters. The Twitter “list” feature allows your current and prospective followers to quickly scan areas of mutual interest and see who you recommend in any given niche. Listing individuals by category is most often considered a compliment and reason for continued engagement.

RTs, #FFs, DMs and Lists can be deployed together to bolster your brand and build a following. Use them, (at least in part), to show your gratitude, nurture relationships and spread “good karma” on Twitter.

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